WHY NEW EU PRIVACY LAWS MATTER FOR ALL – by Joachim Lohkamp


When the EU legislation on data protection was put in place in 1995, the internet looked very different. While previously most data was stored on private or corporate computers, today much of our personal data is in the cloud, under the control of a third party platform or service providers, who are mostly based in Silicon Valley. Though social networks are certainly useful to stay in touch with friends and share information, storing personal data here also risks being used in ways that can have an economic and reputational impact.

GDPR

In response to this, the European commission has decided to pass the GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation). This new law intends to strengthen and unify data protection for individuals within the European Union (EU) while also addressing export of personal data outside the EU.

MORE THAN JUST TECH – by Joachim Lohkamp


“The problem is the dominance of one search engine, one big social network, one Twitter for microblogging. We don’t have a technology problem, we have a social problem.” (Tim Berners-Lee)

During the first Dezentralized Web Summit at the Internet Archive in San Francisco about 70 builders of the web convened to explore the technology required to build a ‘Decentralized Web’. Presenting various technologies such as blockchain, content-addressable and distributed storage, decentralized messaging and communication as well as self-sovereign digital identity, they discussed the decentralized future that could be just around the corner and which could restore the web’s original promise as a free and open network.

However, as tempting as it may be to think that technology could solve it all, and as promising as many of the concepts and protocols sounded, a looming question still remained: how will any of this work in real life?

LOCKING THE WEB OPEN – by Jeremy Gillula and Noah Swartz


“The current Web is not private or censorship-free.” That matter-of-fact bug report provides the reason for the first ever Decentralized Web Summit, taking place this week at the Internet Archive in San Francisco. EFF is participating in the festivities, and whether you’re following along in person, on the live stream, or online, we hope these highlights can bring a bit more of the conversation to you.

The day started with a kickoff by Wendy Hanamura, Director of Partnerships at the Internet Archive, welcoming all of the “great builders of the next decentralized web.” She then handed the stage to Mitchell Baker, Executive Chairperson of the Mozilla Foundation.

FRAGMENTED WORLD – by Peter Senge


“From a very early age, we are taught to break apart problems, to fragment the world. This apparently makes complex tasks and subjects more manageable, but we pay a hidden, enormous price. We can no longer see the consequences of our actions; we lose our intrinsic sense of connection to a larger whole.

When we then try to ‘see the big picture,’ we try to reassemble the fragments in our minds, to list and organize all the pieces. But, as physicist David Bohm says, the task is futile–similar to trying to reassemble the fragments of a broken mirror to see a true reflection. Thus, after a while we give up trying to see the whole altogether.”