THE SERENDIPITY MACHINE – reviewed by Joachim Lohkamp


When I stumbled upon a post of The Serendipity Machine from my friend Bert-Ola Bergstrand on facebook I instantaneously downloaded the book and started reading. There was an intuitive hunch that I couldn’t resist. I read the whole book this same morning and now know it was worth every page of reading. The book provides a great description of social capital dynamics in meshed networks…

FRAGMENTED WORLD – by Peter Senge


“From a very early age, we are taught to break apart problems, to fragment the world. This apparently makes complex tasks and subjects more manageable, but we pay a hidden, enormous price. We can no longer see the consequences of our actions; we lose our intrinsic sense of connection to a larger whole.

When we then try to ‘see the big picture,’ we try to reassemble the fragments in our minds, to list and organize all the pieces. But, as physicist David Bohm says, the task is futile–similar to trying to reassemble the fragments of a broken mirror to see a true reflection. Thus, after a while we give up trying to see the whole altogether.”

ALONE TOGETHER: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other – by Sherry Turkle


As the digital age sparks increasing debate about what new technologies and increased connectivity are doing to our brains, comes this chilling examination of what our iPods and iPads are doing to our relationships from MIT professor Turkle (Simulation and Its Discontents). In this third in a trilogy that explores the relationship between humans and technology, Turkle argues that people are increasingly functioning without face-to-face contact.